Movie REviews REviews by scripture reviews by alphabet
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                                    Hate and Love
 
 
“Sweeney Todd:  The Demon Barber of Fleet Street”:  Yes, Johnny Depp can really sing.  And so can Helena Bonham Carter.  The Stephen Sondheim musical, based on an 18th-century London urban legend, is beyond dark; it’s gothic ironic.  Lots of cruelty, revenge, and cold-blooded murder.  It creates a mood, all right, but even in its music, there’s no love; only hate.
 
“Enchanted”:  The polar opposite of Sweeney Todd.  In this bright-eyed modern fairy tale, the main character is a fairy princess named Giselle (Amy Adams) who’s so cute and sweet and upbeat it’s hard to believe she’s real.  Well, actually, she starts out not real, an animated character, but because of the wicked witch Narissa (Susan Sarandon) who doesn’t want to give up being the Queen, Giselle finds herself on the streets of New York in her ginormous wedding dress, still looking for her gallant groom, Prince Charming.  She’s lost her way, but never her good cheer, even when confronted with impossible obstacles.  Yes, Prince Edward (James Marsden) is on his way to rescue her, but what if his foray into the “real world” exposes him as intrepid but vapid?  Would our fairy princess actually prefer someone with more depth of character, even a bit rough around the edges?  A sweet little charmer of a film.
 
Alvin And the Chipmunks”:  Could we really be interested in a whole movie based on a novelty song from 50 years ago?   But “ Alvin ” clicks because the writers and director are all veteran, award-winning animators, and the main human character is played by Jason Lee, an award-winning television actor.  The computer graphics make the three singing chipmunks “real”, and we find ourselves enjoying this cute little cartoon comedy, despite our initial reluctance.  Another sweet little charmer of a film.
 
“I Am Legend”:  Definitely not a sweet little charmer.  Dr. Robert Neville (Will Smith) is the last man alive.  Literally.  He lives in an empty New York City , where the weeds are growing through the streets and he tracks wild deer down 8th Avenue , and he picks corn from the stalks in Central Park .  It seems that three years before, some smarmy researcher claimed she had found a cure for cancer.  The trouble is, it killed cancer cells, all right, but was itself an incredibly virulent virus, completely resistant to any known medication.  It turned people into rabid zombies, who then preyed on those not yet infected, until there was nobody left except Dr. Neville, medical researcher, somehow immune.  So, after “borrowing” a few Van Goghs for his private digs (why not?), he’s still doggedly doing experiments on captured mutants, trying to “cure” them, but he’s slowly going out of his mind, because there’s no one to connect with.   The zombies are like vampires, burned by the sunlight, but come roaring out at night like ravenous wolves, and the whole dark world is filled with hate and violence, and God seems have left (Psalm 53:1).  When Eve finally does show up at Adam’s door, with Abel already in tow and no Cain in sight, he banishes her from his (Madison Square) Garden to go find her own East of Eden (Genesis 3), where the number saved is considerably less than 144,000 (Revelation 14:3), but not before, Messiah-like, sacrificing himself to save the elect remnant.  So, what if the post-apocalypse destroys as pervasively as The Flood (Genesis 8)?  Does anyone really want to be the Last Man Standing?
Questions for Discussion:
1)      Is it possible that we will have a plague for which there is no cure?
2)      Is it possible that God would choose to decimate the earth in this way? (Genesis 8:21-2)
3)      Is it possible that Prince Charming would turn out to be sincere but shallow?
 
Dr. Ronald P. Salfen, Pastor, Grace Presbyterian Church, Greenville , Texas